5 of the best Christmas stockings

FELT-STOCKING

The Christmas tree is up, and the decorations are down from the loft.  If your stocking is looking a little moth-eaten, here is a small selection of replacements: five of the best stockings.

1. For an injection of colour, try the felt stocking made by Sew Heart Felt for Toast at £39.  The stocking is hand made by communities of women in the Kathmandu valley, Nepal, from organic Tibetan lambswool felt and finished with a multi-coloured hand-embroidered stars.  All the pigments to product the felt are environmentally friendly.  And you could kit out the family in felt slippers to complete the ensemble, which character would you chose from badger or bee, wise owl or fiendish fox?  Another felt stocking, also made in Nepal, by the Women Entrepreneurs Association of Nepal is available from Shared Earth (£6.49) in ice blue or hot pink.

Tori-Murphy-Chevy_Stocking_-_Pearl_Linen_-_Portrait_grande

2. Chevrons are all the rage, so if you or yours have been seduced by geometry, try this 100% Merino Lambswool stocking from Tori Murphy that is woven in Lancashire with a woollen cuff knitted in Yorkshire.  If you are more celestial than chevron, a similar stocking is available in a monochrome star pattern.

jaul_red_01_web_1024x10243. For a Scandinavian look,  you might be tempted by the Jaul stocking (£38) from  Anna Söderström, made of 100% British lambswool and handcrafted in London.
preview_recycled-ricebag-christmas-stocking4. A stocking made from recycled rice bags by a Fairtrade project in Cambodia (£7.50) available from Recycle Recycle.

5.  Make your own.  If your quick, there still might be space to join Emily Gibbs’ Make a Christmas stocking workshop on Monday 9th December.  Or Purlbee provides instructions to make a ‘super easy snowflake stocking’ (their words not mine!!).  Or, of course, you could always tie a huge bow of ribbon around an actual wellington boot!

P.S. To avoid any moths nibbling holes in the toes of your stockings for next year, try sandalwood or cedar balls.  Apparently Giles Deacon, the fashion designer and a keen insect collector, uses conkers as a natural deterrent.  Their brown skins contain a compound called triterpenoid saponin that wards off the pests.  Colibri make natural anti-moth sachets filled with sandalwood and essential oils packed in cotton paper that last up to six months , and available from John Lewis.

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